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2 Terms To Know and 6 Questions To Ask Before You Sign A Contract For A New Roof

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2 Terms To Know and 6 Questions To Ask Before You Sign A Contract For A New Roof

 

You have done your due diligence. You took the time to research a local roofer. You checked on their online reviews, you asked around town, and you took note of the yard signs in your neighborhood—and then you made the phone call.

But now that the roofer is on your doorstep handing you the fine print, and you’re just not sure. And you shouldn’t be. In fact, you should not be fully confident in signing a contract for a new roof until you are familiar with the two terms below.

 

1. What is a “Subject To Agreement”, and should I avoid it?

A Subject To Agreement is not necessarily a bad thing to see on a contract. However, you need to fully understand its implications and what it may bind you to upon signing. A Subject To Agreement comes into play on contracts that involve insurance work. If you are seeking an insurance claim for the damage to your roof, then a Subject To Agreement means that upon approval by your insurance company, that is, upon them granting you compensation for the damage done, then you have agreed to work with this contractor. This binds you to the contractor, depending on insurance approval. Again, this is not a bad thing—as long as you are confident in the contractor. We’ll talk below about six questions you can ask a contractor to make sure they are the right one for your job.

 

2. Should I have a roofer “Waive My Deductible”?

If a roofing contractor offers to “waive your deductible”, “comp your deductible”, “pay your deductible”, or “reimburse your deductible”, then this is a major red flag. This most likely will not be listed anywhere on your contract, but instead is a sales play, spoken only verbally, to convince you to sign—and it is illegal. Insurance companies have deductibles in place for a reason, and if a roofer is attempting to side-step this detail in order to gain your signature, they are not being honest. Now, a reputable contractor should be willing and trained to work with your insurance, and use programs such as Xactimate to make sure you receive any and all compensation that you are entitled to. But if they offer to waive your deductible, beware of possible legal issues ahead.

Understanding the two terms above will go a long way in helping you to decide whether or not to sign a contract for your roof replacement. However, here are six additional questions to consider when choosing a contractor to work on your home:

 

6 Questions For Hiring A Roofer:

 

  • Is this contractor based out of your city or a nearby city?

  • Have they been in business for at least five years?

  • Are they well recommended through online reviews?

  • Do they have a good reputation in your community?

  • Are they trained to work with your insurance?

  • Do they have a good portfolio of jobs completed in your area that you can look through to get a sample of their work?

 

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